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Mar 4 15 4:51 AM

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I haven't posted in awhile but thougtht I'd give you something to think about.  I've postulated that the protozoans we have increase polyamine synthesis which ultimately leads to lower intracellular polyamine levels and a decrease in polyvalent cations.  Primarily, I think we get a decrease in Mb, Mg, Mn, Cu, Zn, Se, and Bo.  I am beginning to think that this decrease in transition metals does two things. 1. It decreases the substrates used in many reactions in the body. and 2. It allows for the change in percentages of bacteria as well as the actual bacterial assortment that live in the GI tract to change to ones that are not conducive to good health. 

I've started supplementing with copper and have noticed a huge benefit.  I started supplementing with iodine once a week.  I ate solid for two days after starting it but now seems to have leveled off.  My weight is around 6 lbs higher now than it has been.  Only a little of that is from eating and my guess is that the bacteria and yeast in my GI tract that have metallothionein have sequestered the copper.  I think they'll sequestor aluminum if no copper is present. 

Eating is the key because when we eat correctly, it not only gives us the nutrients that we are deficient of but also the proper assortment of bacteria for our GI tracts.  This allows our methylation cycles to function better which gives us more T cells, more glutithione, and more products to fight oxidative stress.  Eating correctly is difficult, not because of a lack of will power, but because of a lack of the correct foods.  Raw spinach, broccoli,  cauliflower, carrots, nuts, seeds, fruit, brussel sprouts, oatmeal, souces of daily iodine and copper, it's hard to find these things every day with our lifestyles.  I did not include any meat on this list and meat consumption (IMO) should be variable depending on activity level.  If you are physically active, eat a small portion of meat once that day.  If you are not active, meat should be limited to once or twice a week depending on how the person responds to it.  As a professional hunter, it pains me to say that but it is what is best IMO. 
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linenup

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Mar 4 15 1:08 PM

Thanks for posting, excellent points. Copper plays a key role in the immune response (producing neutrophils etc) and in itself is able to eradicate some pathogens. There are studies showing that copper tabletops in hospital environments are able to control pathogens http://www.npr.org/blogs/goatsandsoda/2014/12/15/369931598/a-copper-bedrail-could-cut-back-on-infections-for-hospital-patients

*all minerals should be in within a balance since there are agonist and antagonist relationships between minerals. For instance excessive copper will bring down zinc and vice versa. All minerals interact with each other. 

All the minerals (in correct balance) play key roles in immunity, detoxification and other processes. Production of anti oxidant compounts (Gluathione, SuperOxide Dismutase and Catalase) are dependent on nutrients to perform their task. SuperOxide Dismutase is dependent on manganese, copper and other minerals http://www.albionnutritionalfacts.com/index.php/component/content/article/29-consumer-newsletter/134-defense-system

I am a big fan of mineral testing through Trace Elements which has helped pinpoint some issues for me. Mineral balance is very important (example relationship between copper and zinc). This test can also pick up endocrine disturbances such as thyroid and adrenal conditions. I think it is invaluable and the testing is very reasonable (<$100), if you are interested in this test send me a message. 

Link for the relationship between nutrition and immunity
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/ss10/nutrition.html

Last Edited By: linenup Mar 4 15 1:53 PM. Edited 2 times.

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Mar 4 15 4:17 PM

Copper can be good when you have a defiency or very toxic. There are many articles about copper toxicity. Some people who worked as painters or photographs used to suffer from bad copper toxicity. Copper can also cause chronic anemia. 

Zinc is also good mineral but can be toxic if too much is taken.

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#3 [url]

Mar 5 15 4:32 PM

Deficiency in copper can also lead to premature greying of hair.

Have you guys tried GAPS? Bone broths, vegetable juices, heavy-dose probiotics, desirable fats etc - it ticks sooo many boxes with very nutrient dense foods - perfect to help fight off infections. The only thing I'd change is fruit - cut it right back because of high sugar content.

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Mar 5 15 7:06 PM

Hi Ebrooke,

Some people say that chicken broth helps them. But other say it increases histamine production and feed bacteria that produce histamine. Histamine is bad for the ileocecal valve. Incompetent ileocecal valve is one of the gates of Chronic fatigue syndromes.  In my case any way, I feel worst after drinking chicken broth.

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linenup

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Mar 5 15 11:19 PM

Thanks for the observations. I think that everyone's tolerance or intolerance to foods are varied which I suspect is due to the type of organism (which may be feeding on some component of the offending food) or alteration of immune response. For me the processed foods are horribly bad along with any fresh dairy (secondary lactose deficiency).

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#6 [url]

Mar 6 15 7:10 AM

Yahia - is the chicken organic? Chicken is probably the most 'processed' meats out there with routine antibiotics etc

Broth (or at least drinking it by itself) can increase stomach acid, so maybe you have something like H Pylori as well? Very common bug (and very hard to get rid of!)

Have you tried Liver Flushes? I feel they helped me significantly, as well as daily saunas - coffee enemas also helped, but can be very dehydrating.

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#7 [url]

Mar 6 15 11:57 AM

Ebrooker,

I bought kosher chicken once and I made some chicken broth. I felt toxic and more pain from drinking it. I read that all MEAT increases histamine production. Bacteria in the colon will produce histamin from meat. Chicken broth also is responsible for histamine production.

We have to understand this: INCOMPETENT ILEO-CECAL VALVE= CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME.  Septic, toxic, highly petrefactive content of the colon MUST not regurgitate into the small intestine. This is worst than leaky gut. In leaky gut, only few toxins will escape to the blood. In ileocecal valve that is incompetent, the whole toxic content is absorbed by the small intestine. Many studies proved this. Incompetent ilceo-cecal valve is related to brain fog, fatigue, lethargy, neuritis, ect.

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#8 [url]

Mar 6 15 2:01 PM

Have you tried exercises and massages to help strengthen the ICV? What about enemas/colonics?

My dietician thought I had a sticky valve as that's where my pains are - the above helped.

What is your diet like at present? Do you have dark circles around your eyes? (Dark, as opposed to just 'puffy')

Can you eat liver? Vit A is extremely good for repairing leaky gut, L Glutamine has also always been helpful to me.

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